Which of the following dial peer commands will match dial strings 1777 and 3777? (Select 3 choices.)

Last Updated on August 6, 2021 by Admin 3

Which of the following dial peer commands will match dial strings 1777 and 3777? (Select 3 choices.)

  • destinationpattern .777
  • destinationpattern *777
  • destinationpattern (13)777
  • destinationpattern [13]777
  • destinationpattern [13]777
Explanation:
The following dial peer commands will match dial strings 1777 and 3777:
-destinationpattern .777
-destinationpattern [13]777
-destinationpattern [13]777

The destination-npattern command is used to match both inbound and outbound dial peers; a dial peer defines a logical route to a telephony endpoint. Outbound dial peers are matched to destination patterns on a digit-by-digit basis as the caller dials the destination number. If multiple dial peers explicitly match the destination pattern, the most specific match for the pattern will be used. The sequence of dialed digits that will be matched for a dial peer can contain the digits 0 through 9, the asterisk (*), and the pound sign (#). In addition, you can use the following symbols to refine the dialing pattern or to match multiple dial strings for a single dial peer:

300-835 Part 11 Q09 046
300-835 Part 11 Q09 046

The dial peer command destinationpattern .777 matches any fourdigit dial string that ends with 777. The period is used as a wildcard character that matches any digit. Not only will the destinationpattern .777 command match 1777 and 3777, it will also match 0777, 2777, 4777, 5777, and so on.
The dial peer command destinationpattern [13]777 matches only the dial strings 1777 and 3777. When square brackets contain a set of digits without a dash, the pattern will match any of the bracketed digits for that digit position. For example, the destinationpattern [135]777 command matches the dial strings 1777, 3777, and 5777. The caret (^) can be used within the brackets to indicate characters that should not match. For example, the destinationpattern [^01479]777 command matches the dial strings 2777, 3777, 5777, 6777, and 8777, but the command does not match the dial strings 0777, 1777, 4777, 7777, and 9777.
The dial peer command destinationpattern [13]777 matches the dial strings 1777, 2777, and 3777. The dash indicates a range of characters. You can also use the dash along with a set of characters. For example, the destinationpattern [135]777 command matches the dial strings 1777, 3777, 4777, and 5777.
The dial peer command destinationpattern *777 does not match the dial strings 1777 and 3777. The * character is not used as a wildcard character? it is used to indicate the asterisk on the telephone keypad. Therefore, the destinationpattern *777 command matches only the dial string *777.
The dial peer command destinationpattern (13)777 does not match the dial strings 1777 and 3777. Parentheses are used to indicate a specific sequence of characters. Therefore, the destinationpattern (13) 777 command matches only the dial string 13777. Parentheses are often used with the %, +, and ? characters to indicate a repeating pattern. For example, the destinationpattern (13)+777 command matches 13777, 1313777, 131313777, and so on.

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