Which of the following techniques is NOT used by distance vector protocols to stop routing loops in a network?

Last Updated on August 7, 2021 by Admin 3

Which of the following techniques is NOT used by distance vector protocols to stop routing loops in a network?

  • Split horizon
  • Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)
  • Holddowns
  • Route poisoning
Explanation:
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) is not used by distance vector protocols to stop routing loops in a network. STP is used to prevent switching loops in a switched network.

Routing loops can occur due to slow convergence and inconsistent routing tables, and can cause excessive use of bandwidth or complete network failure. An example of a routing table problem would be incorrectly configured static default routes. Suppose that Router A is connected to Router B, and the addresses of the interfaces on each end of the link connecting the two routers are as follows:

Router A 192.168.5.1/24
Router B 192.168.5.2/24

A partial output of the routing tables of the two routers is shown below. Router B hosts the connection to the Internet.

routerA# show ip route
Gateway of last resort is 192.168.5.2 to network 0.0.0.0
<Output omitted>

routerB# show ip route
Gateway of last resort is 192.168.5.1 to network 0.0.0.0
<<output omitted>>

From the limited information shown above, you can see that Router A is pointing to Router B for the default route, and Router B is pointing to Router A for the default route. This will cause a routing loop for any traffic that is not in their routing tables. For example, if a ping were initiated to the address 103.5.6.8 and that address was not in the routing tables of Routers A and B, the most likely message received back would NOT be “destination unreachable” but “TTL expired in transit.” This would be caused by the packet looping between the two routers until the TTL expired.

The following techniques are used by distance vector protocols to stop routing loops in a network:
– Split horizon stops routing loops by preventing route update information from being sent back over the same interface on which it arrived.
– Holddown timers prevent regular update messages from reinstating a route that is unstable. The holddown timer places the route in a suspended, or “possibly down” state in the routing table and regular update messages regarding this route will be ignored until the timer expires.
– Route poisoning “poisons” a failed route by increasing its cost to infinity (16 hops, if using RIP). Route poisoning is combined with triggered updates to ensure fast convergence in the event of a network change.

Objective:
Routing Fundamentals
Sub-Objective:
Compare and contrast distance vector and link-state routing protocols

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments